Best of Singapore

Itinerary

Day 1: Arrive at Singapore

Arrive at Singapore International Airport by scheduled flight. Transfer to hotel on SIC Basis, Check In at hotel (1400Hrs). Day is free to relax or you can explore the city on your own. By Evening proceed for a Night Safari Tour. Experience all the drama and enchantment of a tropical jungle at night at the award winning Night Safari. Travel in an open tram through varied terrain under lighting that resembles moon glow lighting, home to more than 1,000 animals, ranging from fierce predators to timid forest dwellers. Overnight stay at hotel.

Day 2: Singapore City Tour

Breakfast at hotel. Proceed for a half day Singapore city tour - a tour of the fascinating city covering Merlion Photo stop, Raffles street, Suntec city, Fountain of Wealth, Orchard Road, Little India & chinatown. Your orientation tour of Singapore begins with a drive around the Civic District past the Padang, Cricket Club, Parliament House, Supreme Court and City Hall. You'll have great views of Marina Bay when you stop for photos at Merlion Park and the Merlion itself, Singapore's mythological creature that is part lion and part fish. Overnight stay at hotel.

Day 3: Sentosa Twilight Tour

Breakfast at hotel. The morning is free to to explore the city on your own. later in the afternoon proceed on a Sentosa Twilight Tour- including Underwater World, Dolphin Lagoon, Singapore Museume and Wings of time. A playground for all and Singapore’s favorite leisure destination with exciting attractions, golden beaches, luxurious hotels and the country’s first integrated resort. Overnight stay at hotel.

Day 4: Singapore Day Free

Breakfast at hotel. Day free for shopping. From high end luxury boutiques to street side flea markets, shopping doesn't get any better than here in the shopping paradise that is Singapore – whatever your budget. Overnight stay at hotel.

Day 5: Depart Singapore

Breakfast at hotel. Check out from the hotel and you will be transferred to the airport in time to board your flight back to your hometown.

About Tour

Singapore is a huge city with several district articles containing sightseeing, restaurant, nightlife. Combining the skyscrapers and subways of a modern, affluent city with a medley of Chinese, Malay and Indian influences and a tropical climate, with tasty food, good shopping and a vibrant night-life scene, this Garden City makes a great stopover or springboard into the region. Singapore is a city-state in Southeast Asia. Founded as a British trading colony in 1819, since independence it has become one of the world's most prosperous countries and boasts the world's busiest port.

Most nationalities can enter Singapore without a visa. Refer to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority for current guidelines, including a list of the 30+ nationalities that are required to obtain a visa in advance. Entry permit duration depends on nationality and entry point: most people get 14 or 30 days, although EU, Norwegian, Swiss and US passport holders get 90 days. Citizens of some CIS countries (eg: Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan) can transit 4 days without a visa, if they have tickets to a third country.

Singapore has very strict drug laws, and drug trafficking carries a mandatory death penalty — which is applied to everyone, including foreigners. Even if you technically haven't entered Singapore and are merely transiting (eg. changing flights without the need to clear passport control and customs) while in possession of drugs, you would still be hanged by the neck until dead on the next Friday after your sentencing (unless sentenced or your appeal against sentence refused on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday or if you are a foreigner when your consulate is given at least 7 days notice ). The paranoid might also like to note that in Singapore, it is an offence even to have any drug metabolites in your system, even if they were consumed outside Singapore, and Customs occasionally does spot urine tests at the airport! In addition, bringing in explosives or firearms without a permit is also a capital offence in Singapore.

Bring prescriptions for any medicines you may have with you, and obtain prior permission from the Health Sciences Authority before bringing in any sedatives (eg. Valium/diazepam) or strong painkillers (eg. codeine). Hippie types may expect a little extra attention from Customs, but getting a shave and a haircut is no longer a condition for entry.

Duty free allowances for alcohol are 1 L each of wine, beer and spirits, though the 1 L of spirits may be substituted with 1 L of wine or beer,

unless you are entering from Malaysia. Travellers entering from Malaysia are not entitled to any duty free allowance. Alcohol may not be brought in by persons under the age of 18. There is no duty free allowance for cigarettes: all cigarettes legally sold in Singapore are stamped "SDPC", and smokers caught with unmarked cigarettes may be fined $500 per pack. (In practice, though, bringing in one opened pack is usually tolerated.)

If you declare your cigarettes or excess booze at customs, you can opt to pay the tax or let the customs officers keep the cigarettes until your departure. The import of chewing gum is technically illegal, but in practice customs officers would usually not bother with a few sticks for personal consumption.

Pornography, pirated goods and publications by the Jehovah's Witnesses and the Unification Church may not be imported to Singapore, and baggage is scanned at air, land and sea entry points. In theory, all entertainment media including movies and video games must be sent to the Board of Censors for approval before they can be brought into Singapore, but that is rarely if ever enforced for original (non-pirated) goods. Pirated CDs or DVDs, on the other hand, can land you fines of up to $1000 per disc.

Singapore has a variety of parks and projects which often feature its natural tropical environment. The Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, allows people to explore Asian, African and South American habitats at night, without any visible barriers between guests and the wild animals.

Singapore has its Singapore Botanical Gardens open to the public that is 52 hectares large, and includes the National Orchid collection with over 3000 types of orchids growing.

Recently the government has also been promoting the Sungei Buloh Wetlands Reserve as a quiet getaway from the stress of modern life.

The Bukit Timah Nature Reserve is an extensive nature reserve which covers much of the Bukit Timah Hill, and is the only remaining place where primary rainforest still exists on the island.

The Jurong BirdPark includes extensive specimens of exotic bird life from around the world, including a flock of one thousand flamingos. Pulau Ubin, an island offshore Singapore, is slowly becoming a popular tourist spot. The nature wildlife there is left undisturbed.

Future River Safari will a latest attraction in Singapore which allows people to get up-close with river animals in major rivers around the world such as the Mississippi, Congo, Murray, Ganges, Mekong, Amazon, Nile and the Yangtze River, which is slated to open by the end of 2012.

Shopping is second only to eating as a national pastime, which means that Singapore has an abundance of shopping malls, and low taxes and tariffs on imports coupled with huge volume mean that prices are usually very competitive. While you won't find any bazaars with dirt-cheap local handicrafts (in fact, virtually everything sold in Singapore is made elsewhere), goods are generally of reasonably good quality and shopkeepers are generally quite honest due to strong consumer protection laws. Most shops are open 7 days a week from 10AM-10PM, although smaller operations (particularly those outside shopping malls) close earlier — 7PM is common — and perhaps on Sundays as well. Mustafa in Little India is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Keep an eye out for the Great Singapore Sale , usually held in June-July, when shopping centres pull out all stops to attract punters. Many shops along Orchard Road and Scotts Road now offer late night shopping on the last Friday of every month with over 250 retailers staying open till midnight.

  • Antiques:The second floor of the Tanglin Shopping Centre on Orchard and the shops on South Bridge Rd in Chinatown are good options if looking for the real thing (or high-quality reproductions).
  • Clothes, high-street: Ion, Ngee Ann City (Takashimaya) and Paragon on Orchard have the heaviest concentration of branded boutiques. There are another malls such as Raffles City located at City Hall MRT that also hosts a variety of brands for instance, Kate Spade, Timberland.
  • Clothes, tailored: Virtually all hotels have a tailor shop attached, and touting tailors are a bit of a nuisance in Chinatown. As elsewhere, you'll get what you pay for and will get poor quality if you don't have the time for multiple fittings or the skill to check what you're getting. Prices vary widely: a local shop using cheap fabrics can do a shirt for $40, while Singapore's best-known tailor, Brazil Tailor at the Upper Bukit Timah, will charge at affordable price.
  • Clothes, youth: Most of Bugis is dedicated to the young, hip and cost-conscious. Currently Bugis street(Opposite Bugis MRT) is the most popular in the Bugis area, consisting of 3 levels of shops. Some spots of Orchard, notably Far East Plaza not to be confused with Far East Shopping Centre and the top floor of the Heeren, also target the same market but prices are generally higher.
  • Fakes: Unlike most South-East Asian countries, pirated goods are not openly on sale and importing them to the city-state carries heavy fines. Fake goods are nevertheless not difficult to find in Little India, Bugis, or even in the underpasses of Orchard Road.
  • Food: Local supermarkets Cold Storage, Prime Mart, Shop 'n' Save and NTUC Fairprice are ubiquitous, but for specialties, Jason's Marketplace in the basement of Raffles City and Tanglin Market Place at Tanglin Mall (both on Orchard) are some of Singapore's best-stocked gourmet supermarkets, with a vast array of imported products. Takashimaya's basement (Orchard) has lots of small quirky shops and makes for a more interesting browse. For a more Singaporean (and much cheaper) shopping experience, seek out any neighbourhood wet market, like Little India's Tekka Market. For eating out, most shopping centres offer a range of small snack stands and eateries in their basements, as well as a food court or two.
  • Watches: High-end watches are very competitively priced. Ngee Ann City (Orchard) has dedicated shops such as Piaget and Cartier, while Millenia Walk (Marina Bay) features the Cortina Watch Espace selling 30 brands including Audemars Piguet & Patek Philippe, as well as several other standalone shops.

For purchases of over $100 per day per participating shop, you may be able to get a 6% refund of your 7% GST at Changi Airport or Seletar Airport, but the process is a bit of a bureaucratic hassle. At the shop you need to ask for a tax refund cheque. Before checking in at the airport, present this cheque together with the items purchased and your passport at the GST customs counter. Get the receipt stamped there. Then proceed with check-in and go through security. On the air side, bring the stamped cheque to the refund counter to cash it in or get the GST back on your credit card. See Singapore Customs for the full scoop.

Exclusions

Exclusions

  • Any tips, surcharges, minibar, laundry, telephone bills or any personal expensesi
  • Airfare and Airport taxes as applicable
  • Any service is not mention in itinerary or Inclusion
  • Optional Tours

 

Terms & Conditions

Terms & Conditions

  • Rates and hotel are subject to change without any prior notice depending on the availability at the time of finalizes the booking.
  • Rooms and rates are subject to availability at the time of booking as no options are held as of now.
  • Hotels advised are our suggestions only; we are not responsible for individual clients preferences, please check before finalize booking.
  • Strictly no refunds for unutilized tours / Transfer
  • Charges will be imposed by hotels for booking cancelled

 

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